Current Issue June 2018

Delineation of the extent of early gastric cancer by magnifying narrow-band imaging and chromoendoscopy: a multicentre randomized controlled trial
by Nagahama et al.

Fig. 3 Forceps biopsy for histological diagnosis. a The biopsy specimens were taken from 5mm outside (X1) the oral-most margin (dotted line) of the cancer. b The biopsy specimens were taken from 5mm inside (X2) the oral-most margin (dotted line) of the cancer.

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Percutaneous-endoscopic rendezvous procedure for the management of bile duct injuries after cholecystectomy: short- and longterm outcomes by Schreuder et al.

Fig. 1 Example of a successful rendezvous procedure in a 20-year-old woman with an Amsterdamtype D/Strasberg type E3 bile duct injury. a Cholangiography showed complete transection of the common bile duct (CBD; bold arrow) with leakage of contrast into the subhepatic space, forming a biloma. A percutaneous transhepatic biliary drain is in place in the right system (arrow).

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A double-reprocessing high-level disinfection protocol does not eliminate positive cultures from the elevators of duodenoscopes by Rex et al.

Fig. 1 The Olympus brushes designed for cleaning the elevators of duodenoscopes: a the single-use MAJ-1888 for use on 180 series duodenoscopes, made available in May 2015; b the reusable MAJ-1534 for use on 160 series duodenoscopes, made available in March 2016.

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Early removal of biflanged metal stents in the management of pancreatic walled-off necrosis: a prospective study by Dhir et al.

Fig. 3 Endoscopic assessment of pancreatic walled-off necrosis (WON) cavity. a Clean cavity after necrosectomy. The cavity has not collapsed and is not covered by granulation tissue. The biflanged metal stent (BFMS) should remain in situ at this point. b Complete collapse of the WON cavity, with granulation tissue seen at the distal end of the BFMS, indicating appropriate time for stent removal.

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Short-term outcomes following endoscopic submucosal dissection of large protruding colorectal neoplasms by Sakamoto et al.

Fig. 4 Endoscopic images of a lesion that was ultimately unsuitable for endoscopic submucosal dissection showing: a a protruding-type lesion (0-Is), about 40mm in size, located in the ascending colon; b tubular and villous tumor components from the vessel and surface patterns on magnifying narrow-band imaging; c an attempt to resect this lesion using endoscopic submucosal dissection, which was made after judging it to be a noninvasive carcinoma; d a definite muscular retracting sign after initial mucosal cutting, which therefore led to the endoscopic procedure being discontinued. The patient subsequently underwent laparoscopic surgery, with histology showing an intramucosal neoplasm (high grade dysplasia).

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Clinical outcomes of endoscopic submucosal dissection for superficial esophageal neoplasms extending to the cervical esophagus by Ariyoshi et al.

Fig. 1 An example of a post-endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD) perforation (patient #10). The right lung was observed during the second session of EBD. The patient was diagnosed with perforation and pneumothorax, and subsequently underwent urgent surgery.

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